On October 11, 2018, the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania (“Court”) vacated the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (“PUC”) Order approving the acquisition of the wastewater system assets of New Garden Township and New Garden Sewer Authority (collectively “New Garden”) by Aqua Pennsylvania Wastewater, Inc. (“Aqua”).[1]  Aqua’s Application sought PUC approval of the acquisition, a Certificate

Across much of the United States, the number of municipalities imposing stormwater management fees upon property owners has increased dramatically in recent years.  The rising prevalence of stormwater management fees has predictably led to local and state court challenges by businesses, as non-residential property owners are typically more severely impacted by stormwater management fees in

On November 8, 2017, Aqua Pennsylvania (“Aqua”) filed a Complaint in the Pennsylvania Court of Common Pleas of Bucks County against the Bucks County Water and Sewer Authority (“BCWSA” or “Authority”), docketed at Case #2017-07215.  Joining Aqua as co-Plaintiff is J. Kevan Busik, a customer and ratepayer of BCWSA.

The Aqua Complaint alleges BCWSA (and

Municipalities throughout Pennsylvania are in the process of implementing local stormwater ordinances and fees that will likely impact land development.  Recent changes to federal and state laws have forced municipalities to seek new funding sources, regulate businesses that have large areas of solid pavement and roofing (“impervious” areas), and limit stormwater impacts that occur

After December 7, 2017, new Pennsylvania land development projects that disturb in total over an acre of land will require an individual National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (“NPDES’) permit.  Although the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (“PaDEP”) missed the window to timely reauthorize General Permit PAG-02, it has administratively extended existing issued permits which have

The Susquehanna River Basin Commission (“SRBC”) approved a final rulemaking at its business meeting on June 16, 2017, that will regulate “grandfathered” water withdrawals and consumptive uses as we explained in our analysis of the proposal last Fall.  This new regulation will be effective January 2018.  While the SRBC revised the proposed rule in

On May 17, 2017, the Pennsylvania Environmental Quality Board (“EQB”) greenlighted a proposal that would substantially increase fees for public water suppliers regulated by the Department of Environmental Protection (“PADEP”).  In addition to seeking the fee hike, the proposal would amend other regulations under the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act (“SDWA”), with some changes being

We periodically report on matters that impact the costs large volume commercial, industrial and institutional customers pay for water/wastewater/stormwater service.  Below is information pertaining to a York Water Company matter before the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (“PUC” or “Commission”).

At the March 2, 2017, Public Meeting, the PUC voted to approve York Water Company’s (“York

At McNees, Wallace, and Nurick, LLC, we often write of current or emerging issues that may have significant cost implications for large commercial, industrial and institutional end users in Pennsylvania.  We also closely monitor newly proposed legislation or regulation that may affect service rates, terms and use conditions.

For example, in 2016, we closely tracked

A recent decision by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (“PUC” or “Commission”) confirms that Pennsylvania public utilities with combined sewer systems (i.e., systems that collect both sewage and stormwater) may incorporate stormwater charges in their service charges.  While some public utilities have already been incorporating stormwater collection charges in their sewage rates, not all