A recent decision by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (“PUC” or “Commission”) confirms that Pennsylvania public utilities with combined sewer systems (i.e., systems that collect both sewage and stormwater) may incorporate stormwater charges in their service charges.  While some public utilities have already been incorporating stormwater collection charges in their sewage rates, not all utilities have carried forth this practice.  As a result, this decision could increase sewage rates for some large commercial and industrial customers experiencing significant stormwater flows.

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On March 30, 2016, the Pennsylvania American Water Company (“PAWC”) and the Sewer Authority of the City of Scranton (“SSA”) filed an Application with the PUC to permit PAWC to purchase the SSA’s combined sewer system.  As indicated above, combined sewer systems collect sewage and stormwater, so the PUC’s disposition of this Application would clarify the ability of a Pennsylvania public utility to include stormwater charges in its wastewater service rates.  Although Administrative Law Judges David A. Salapa and Steven K. Haas recommended that the PUC reject the proposed Application, the PUC approved it on October 19, 2016.

As a result of the PUC’s approval, statutory enabling legislation was required.  Senate Bill No. 881 was revived and amended to make necessary changes to the Public Utility Code.  Specifically, the Bill amends the Public Utility Code to change the reference of “sewer” to “wastewater,” and expanded the definition of wastewater to include certain “stormwater.”  This bill passed both chambers [October 26 (Senate) and October 27 (House)] and was signed by Governor Wolf.

The Bill provides as follows:

Wastewater.  Any used water and water-carried solids collected or conveyed by a sewer, including:

(1)  Sewage, as defined in Section 2 of the act of January 24, 1966 (1965 P.L. 1535, No. 537), known as the Pennsylvania Sewage Facilities Act.

(2)  Industrial waste originating from an establishment.  For the purposes of this paragraph, the terms “industrial waste” and “establishment” shall be as defined in Section 1 of the Act of June 22, 1937 (P.L. 1987, No. 394), known as the Clean Streams Law.

(3)   Infiltration or inflow into sewers.

(4)   Other water containing solids or pollutants.

(5)  Storm water which is or will become mixed with waters described under paragraph (1), (2), (3) or (4) within a combined sewer system.

The term does not include storm water collected in a Municipal Separate Storm Sewer, as that term is defined by 40 CFR 122.26(b)(8) (Relating to storm water discharges (applicable to state NPDES programs, see § 123.25)), that does not flow into a combined sewer system.

This legislation, now codified as PA Act 154, allows Pennsylvania utilities providing wastewater service to include, in certain cases (i.e., combined sewer systems), stormwater charges into rates.  While some Pennsylvania municipal wastewater service providers (e.g., Philadelphia Water Department) have been including stormwater charges in wastewater rates for some time, it will be much more commonplace with PUC-regulated service providers with this new legislation.