Legislation to reform Ohio’s energy efficiency, peak demand reduction, and renewable energy mandates is again before the Ohio General Assembly.  House Bill (“HB”) 114 was introduced in the Ohio House on March 7, 2017.  The bill has 55 co-sponsors.

As a bit of background, in 2008 Ohio adopted mandates that require each electric utility in the state to reduce energy consumption measured as a reduction in kilowatt-hours (“kWh”) of sales as well as a peak kilowatt (“kW”) demand reduction relative to a historic baseline.  The 2008 legislation also required each utility and each competitive supplier to source a percentage of its generation supply from renewable energy sources.

Since 2008, there have been several legislative changes to the mandates, including a provision that permits businesses served above primary voltage and those that self-assess the kWh tax to opt-out of the energy efficiency and peak demand reduction mandates beginning January 1, 2017.

If adopted, HB 114 would extend the opt-out opportunity of the energy efficiency and peak demand reduction mandates to businesses that qualify as mercantile customers under Ohio law (businesses that consume 700,000 kWh per year or are part of a national account involving multiple facilities in one or more states) effective January 1, 2019.

HB 114 also contains a provision that would reduce the energy efficiency mandate from 22.5% to 17.3% and would provide for counting reform as to what the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (“PUCO”) may count towards the electric utilities’ compliance obligation.

HB 114 also proposes changes to the renewable mandates.  If adopted, the legislation would transform the renewable mandate to a non-mandatory provision and would provide all customers of electric utilities the opportunity to opt-out of the renewable mandates beginning January 1, 2019.

HB 114 further proposes a firm end-date to the energy efficiency, peak demand reduction, and renewable mandates in 2027.  Current law provides that at the end of the year-after-year escalation in the mandates that the final tier of compliance continue indefinitely thereafter.

The bill is similar to legislation that passed the Ohio House and Senate last year but was vetoed by the Governor late in 2016.

The full text of HB 114 is available at:

https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/legislation/legislation-summary?id=GA132-HB-114